317 St. Francis Dr. Suite 350
Greenville, SC 29601


317 St. Francis Dr.
Suite 350
Greenville, SC 29601
Tel: 1-864-235-1834, Fax: 1-864-235-2486

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864-235-1834

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Fibromyalgia and RSD/CRPS

Dr. Schwartz is the Medical Director of the St. Francis Bon Secours Hospital Fibromyalgia Restorative Care Program.     He is also the Medical Director of the South Carolina Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy and Fibromyalgia Support Group, which he founded in 1990.

Dr. Schwartz has numerous publications and lectured extensively on both Fibromyalgia and RSD/CRPS.   His practice has special emphasis on patients with complex, chronic pain that have weather sensitive aspect to their symptoms.

He has a unique approach that reduces Total Load, the total number of things that do not allow someone to be well, and addresses autonomic dysfunction (eye, bowel, bladder, heart, skin, and movement disorders) associated with these conditions.

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Hypermobility/Ehlers-Danlos

Hypermobility Syndrome, or weak ligaments and flexible joints, can cause chronic aches and pains. Like most diseases hypermobility syndrome can have mild or severe presentations. Many people may simply be predisposed to ankle sprains and weak ligaments. Others may describe themselves as double jointed or an accident waiting to happen. Marfans and Ehlers Danlos Syndromes are names for more severe forms of the disease however there is no universal agreement that they are the same thing.

One of the classic signs of hypermobility syndrome is thumbs can bend back to touch the forearm, the little finger may bend back more than 90 degrees

Patients with hypermobility syndrome can often bend over and can touch their hands flat on the ground

One of the classic signs of Hypermobility Syndrome is joints that move beyond their normal expected range. Thumbs can bend back to touch the forearm, the little finger may bend back more than 90 degrees, and there can be hyper-extensible elbows and knees. Patients with Hypermobility Syndrome can often bend over and can touch their hands flat on the ground. They may have tall parents and often the fathers have a high arched palate.

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Treating Peripheral Neuropathy

Treatment programs and techniques for peripheral neuropathy

Those with peripheral neuropathy battle the condition day-in and day-out. Peripheral neuropathy is the most common type of neuropathy. Symptoms include numbness, tingling, prickling, tightness, pain, and cold or burning sensations in the extremities (hands, arms, legs or feet). The condition may also cause muscle weakness and lead to undetected infections, sores or wounds. But those living with peripheral neuropathy may find relief with one of our treatment programs.

Often times, patients are prescribed pain medication to relieve their symptoms, but pain medication tends to mask symptoms, and not actually treat the condition. At Piedmont Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, we aim to treat peripheral neuropathy.

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