317 St. Francis Dr. Suite 350
Greenville, SC 29601


317 St. Francis Dr.
Suite 350
Greenville, SC 29601
Tel: 1-864-235-1834, Fax: 1-864-235-2486

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864-235-1834

Neuropathy

Peripheral Neuropathy: Diagnosis and Treatment

There are several diagnosis and treatment options for peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy means the nerve endings in the hands or feet are not working properly. Clinical presentations can include numbness, weakness and burning pain. If the nerve endings in the feet are more severely involved patients may complain of poor balance or get open sores. When the hands are involved difficulty performing normal tasks like holding objects, manipulating door keys, or being able to tell if tap water is hot can be a problem.

The most common form is peripheral neuropathy involves the small, sensory nerve fibers. The larger fibers are responsible for motor control. There are also very small nerve fibers, called the sympathetic nerves, which are responsible for burning pain and skin temperature regulation. Depending upon which nerve fibers are involved different symptoms occur. Hereditary diseases, hardening of the arteries, diabetes, and heavy metals may all be responsible for peripheral neuropathy. Most often however doctor just can’t figure out why someone has neuropathy. Doctors call that form “Idiopathic” (no known cause).

The most common forms of peripheral neuropathy are due to vascular disease or diabetes. In these instances the small, sensory nerve fibers usually are the first to become involved. In early cases people often don’t even know they have a problem. Possibly they went to the doctor with low back pain only to find out during electrical nerve testing (EMG and nerve conduction testing) that there was a problem discovered in the sensory nerves in the feet.

More advanced nerve testing for the sympathetic nerves includes the use of thermal imaging or sympathetic skin response testing. In this test nothing touches the skin; infrared imaging is used to measure abnormalities in skin temperature regulation. Depending upon the results of nerve testing follow up studies of the vasculature or laboratory looking for other reasons for the neuropathy may be done as well.

Treatment depends upon the kind of neuropathy found but most commonly is directed toward restoring function (when the motor fibers are involved) or reducing pain. If the sensory nerves are severely involved then it is also very important to educate patients about skin care so that they don’t get an ulcer. These can be very hard to heal.

There are several medications that address neuropathy pain, however they all come with their own set of side effects and are only marginally successful in providing relief. Nerve blocks can be particularly helpful, especially when treatment of the nerves closer to the trunk or in the spine have an impact on symptoms. More recently Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) and Stem Cell injections have shown quite a bit of promise.

While we are not quite certain why these injections (or grafts) work we do know that when properly placed they can cause new blood vessel growth in the extremities. That of course can lead to both pain reduction and regeneration. This is an exciting and promising treatment option. If you have peripheral neuropathy it is a good idea to explore your options and find a doctor with specialized expertise in its diagnosis and treatment.

Neuropathy and PAD brochure (PDF)

Getting to Grips with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Getting to Grips with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Wrist pain, pins and needles and loss of grip could be due to carpal tunnel syndrome.

carpal tunnel syndrome reliefIf you’re getting pain in your hands, numbness or pins and needles at night, and find you can’t grip as well as you used to, you might start to worry about arthritis. It’s the logical candidate for these kinds of symptoms, but don’t assume it’s responsible in your case – get yourself checked out by your doctor. You could be suffering from ligament strain in the arm or neck, or have pinched or inflamed nerves in the neck, and it’s important to ascertain the cause of your symptoms to ensure you receive the appropriate treatment. One of the most common causes of these symptoms is a condition called Carpal Tunnel Syndrome.

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Peripheral Neuropathy: Diagnosis and Treatment

There are several diagnosis and treatment options for peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy means the nerve endings in the hands or feet are not working properly. Clinical presentations can include numbness, weakness and burning pain. If the nerve endings in the feet are more severely involved patients may complain of poor balance or get open sores. When the hands are involved difficulty performing normal tasks like holding objects, manipulating door keys, or being able to tell if tap water is hot can be a problem.

The most common form is peripheral neuropathy involves the small, sensory nerve fibers. The larger fibers are responsible for motor control. There are also very small nerve fibers, called the sympathetic nerves, which are responsible for burning pain and skin temperature regulation. Depending upon which nerve fibers are involved different symptoms occur. Hereditary diseases, hardening of the arteries, diabetes, and heavy metals may all be responsible for peripheral neuropathy. Most often however doctor just can’t figure out why someone has neuropathy. Doctors call that form “Idiopathic” (no known cause).

The most common forms of peripheral neuropathy are due to vascular disease or diabetes. In these instances the small, sensory nerve fibers usually are the first to become involved. In early cases people often don’t even know they have a problem. Possibly they went to the doctor with low back pain only to find out during electrical nerve testing (EMG and nerve conduction testing) that there was a problem discovered in the sensory nerves in the feet.

More advanced nerve testing for the sympathetic nerves includes the use of thermal imaging or sympathetic skin response testing. In this test nothing touches the skin; infrared imaging is used to measure abnormalities in skin temperature regulation. Depending upon the results of nerve testing follow up studies of the vasculature or laboratory looking for other reasons for the neuropathy may be done as well.

Treatment depends upon the kind of neuropathy found but most commonly is directed toward restoring function (when the motor fibers are involved) or reducing pain. If the sensory nerves are severely involved then it is also very important to educate patients about skin care so that they don’t get an ulcer. These can be very hard to heal.

There are several medications that address neuropathy pain, however they all come with their own set of side effects and are only marginally successful in providing relief. Nerve blocks can be particularly helpful, especially when treatment of the nerves closer to the trunk or in the spine have an impact on symptoms. More recently Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) and Stem Cell injections have shown quite a bit of promise.

While we are not quite certain why these injections (or grafts) work we do know that when properly placed they can cause new blood vessel growth in the extremities. That of course can lead to both pain reduction and regeneration. This is an exciting and promising treatment option. If you have peripheral neuropathy it is a good idea to explore your options and find a doctor with specialized expertise in its diagnosis and treatment.

Neuropathy and PAD brochure (PDF)

Understanding and Treating Peripheral Neuropathy

Peripheral neuropathy is a disorder of the nervous system that presents as weakness, numbness, and/or pain in the extremities, typically beginning in the lower extremities.  Other common symptoms include unexplained sensations, hot or cold sensations, tightness, and trouble with day to day activities due to loss of balance/coordination. The causes of peripheral neuropathies are not well understood, because in most cases people are told there is no identifiable reason. However, hardening of the arteries, diabetes, drinking, or chemotherapy are common causes.  With a little bit of investigative work cause can usually be identified.

Read More

Peripheral Neuropathy: Diagnosis and Treatment

There are several diagnosis and treatment options for peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy means the nerve endings in the hands or feet are not working properly. Clinical presentations can include numbness, weakness and burning pain. If the nerve endings in the feet are more severely involved patients may complain of poor balance or get open sores. When the hands are involved difficulty performing normal tasks like holding objects, manipulating door keys, or being able to tell if tap water is hot can be a problem.

The most common form is peripheral neuropathy involves the small, sensory nerve fibers. The larger fibers are responsible for motor control. There are also very small nerve fibers, called the sympathetic nerves, which are responsible for burning pain and skin temperature regulation. Depending upon which nerve fibers are involved different symptoms occur. Hereditary diseases, hardening of the arteries, diabetes, and heavy metals may all be responsible for peripheral neuropathy. Most often however doctor just can’t figure out why someone has neuropathy. Doctors call that form “Idiopathic” (no known cause).

The most common forms of peripheral neuropathy are due to vascular disease or diabetes. In these instances the small, sensory nerve fibers usually are the first to become involved. In early cases people often don’t even know they have a problem. Possibly they went to the doctor with low back pain only to find out during electrical nerve testing (EMG and nerve conduction testing) that there was a problem discovered in the sensory nerves in the feet.

More advanced nerve testing for the sympathetic nerves includes the use of thermal imaging or sympathetic skin response testing. In this test nothing touches the skin; infrared imaging is used to measure abnormalities in skin temperature regulation. Depending upon the results of nerve testing follow up studies of the vasculature or laboratory looking for other reasons for the neuropathy may be done as well.

Treatment depends upon the kind of neuropathy found but most commonly is directed toward restoring function (when the motor fibers are involved) or reducing pain. If the sensory nerves are severely involved then it is also very important to educate patients about skin care so that they don’t get an ulcer. These can be very hard to heal.

There are several medications that address neuropathy pain, however they all come with their own set of side effects and are only marginally successful in providing relief. Nerve blocks can be particularly helpful, especially when treatment of the nerves closer to the trunk or in the spine have an impact on symptoms. More recently Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) and Stem Cell injections have shown quite a bit of promise.

While we are not quite certain why these injections (or grafts) work we do know that when properly placed they can cause new blood vessel growth in the extremities. That of course can lead to both pain reduction and regeneration. This is an exciting and promising treatment option. If you have peripheral neuropathy it is a good idea to explore your options and find a doctor with specialized expertise in its diagnosis and treatment.

Neuropathy and PAD brochure (PDF)

Things You Can Do to Boost Your Neuropathy-Pain Relief Treatment

Neuropathic pain is usually sharp or burning in character. With peripheral neuropathy, the pain and numbness usually occurs first in the feet. With more severe disease, it can progress up into the legs or involve the hands. Numbness in the feet can be especially dangerous as skin sores may unknowingly occur. If the sores become deep, or remain open, ulcers can develop. Weakness usually occurs first in the legs. If a trunk or root is involved, as in radiation-induced plexopathy or diabetic neuropathy, the thigh may become weak. If weakness begins in the periphery, as with environmental, chemotherapy, or compressive neuropathies, the foot may be affected first. In either instance, walking and climbing stairs can be difficult. Neuropathy can also affect the arm resulting in a weak grasp or shoulder function. When there is a loss of ability to do something, irrespective of the reason, it is called functional impairment.

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