317 St. Francis Dr. Suite 350
Greenville, SC 29601


317 St. Francis Dr.
Suite 350
Greenville, SC 29601
Tel: 1-864-235-1834, Fax: 1-864-235-2486

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864-235-1834

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Ten Common Myths of Low Back Pain

Learn about ten common myths of low back pain.

1) Rest helps: While it is generally a good idea not to overdo, there is no evidence that rest helps and there is good evidence that outcomes are better when activity is encouraged.

2) Degenerative Disk Disease: While degenerative disk disease does suggest wear and tear, it is present it virtually everyone beyond 35 years of age. Its mere presence does not in and of itself mean that it is the source of your pain. Ten Common Myths of Low Back Pain

Links: Piedmont Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation

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Hypermobility/Ehlers-Danlos

Hypermobility Syndrome, or weak ligaments and flexible joints, can cause chronic aches and pains. Like most diseases hypermobility syndrome can have mild or severe presentations. Many people may simply be predisposed to ankle sprains and weak ligaments. Others may describe themselves as double jointed or an accident waiting to happen. Marfans and Ehlers Danlos Syndromes are names for more severe forms of the disease however there is no universal agreement that they are the same thing.

One of the classic signs of hypermobility syndrome is thumbs can bend back to touch the forearm, the little finger may bend back more than 90 degrees

Patients with hypermobility syndrome can often bend over and can touch their hands flat on the ground

One of the classic signs of Hypermobility Syndrome is joints that move beyond their normal expected range. Thumbs can bend back to touch the forearm, the little finger may bend back more than 90 degrees, and there can be hyper-extensible elbows and knees. Patients with Hypermobility Syndrome can often bend over and can touch their hands flat on the ground. They may have tall parents and often the fathers have a high arched palate.

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Post Polio

Polio and motor Peripheral Neuropathy have much in common. They both involve the motor nerve fibers that carry impulses from the brain to our muscles. These nerve fibers are responsible for movement. Without them the brain signals that direct movement would never be able to communicate with our muscles.

In the case of Polio, the polio virus infected a cell body within the spinal cord named the Anterior Horn Cell. The anterior horn cell is the starting point — the life generator — of the motor nerve fiber. The anterior horn cell relays information from the brain, via the spinal cord, to the rest of the motor nerve that then communicates with the muscle.

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